The PUSH for MUSH

HOW DOES ONTARIO MEASURE UP?








UPDATE: On March 6, 2014, the Ontario government announced new accountability measures that would expand the Ontario Ombudsman's oversight to include municipalities, universities, and school boards. They would also create a new Patient Ombudsman for complaints about hospitals and long-term care homes, and give the existing Provincial Advocate for Children and Youth the power to investigate children’s aid societies. READ MORE
The legislation was tabled in the Legislative Assembly on March 24, 2014. The Ombudsman welcomed the bill, but noted he continues to have "some serious concerns about some of its shortcomings." He added, "In deference to the parliamentary process, I will address those concerns at the appropriate time, before the appropriate legislative committee." READ MORE




The Ombudsman's authority, as established by the Ombudsman Act to oversee the delivery of public services, has not been modernized in more than 35 years. Ontario has fallen behind in oversight of non-governmental organizations providing critical public services referred to as the “MUSH” sector - municipalities (except for the ability to investigate complaints about closed meetings in some cases), universities, school boards, hospitals, nursing homes and long-term care facilities, police, and children’s aid societies. The Ombudsman of Ontario's authority with respect to this sector is the most limited in Canada.

How the mandate of Ontario’s Ombudsman compares to other Canadian Ombudsman in key public service areas:

Provinces Boards
 of
Education
Child Protection Services Public Hospitals Nursing Homes and Long-
Term Care Facilities
Munici-palities Police Comp-
laints Review Mecha-
nism
Univer-sities
Ontario No No No No No1 No No
Alberta No Yes Yes2 Yes3 No Yes No
British Columbia
Yes Yes Yes4 Yes Yes No Yes
Manitoba No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes5 No
New Brunswick Yes Yes6 Yes7 No Yes Yes8 No

Newfoundland and Labrador

Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes
Nova Scotia Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No
Quebec No Yes9 Yes Yes No Yes No
Saskatchewan
No Yes Yes Yes No Yes No
Yukon
Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No10 No

Amended: June 7, 2011

  1. In Ontario, the Ombudsman has jurisdiction to investigate complaints about some municipal closed meetings.
  2. In Alberta, the Ombudsman has jurisdiction to investigate complaints about the patient concerns resolution processes of hospitals.
  3. In Alberta, the Ombudsman has jurisdiction to investigate complaints about the patient concerns resolution processes of long-term care facilities and nursing homes.
  4. In British Columbia, the Ombudsman also has jurisdiction over regional health boards and regional hospital districts.
  5. In Manitoba, the Ombudsman’s jurisdiction over police, which are municipal, flows from his jurisdiction over municipalities. The Ombudsman also has jurisdiction over the Law Enforcement Review Agency (LERA), which is part of the Justice Department.
  6. In New Brunswick, the Ombudsman is prevented from investigating a matter that is or has been investigated or reviewed by the Office of the Child and Youth Advocate. Currently, the New Brunswick Ombudsman is also the Child and Youth Advocate.
  7. In New Brunswick, the Ombudsman has jurisdiction over Regional Health Authorities, which operate, own and dispense all services for hospitals.
  8. In New Brunswick, the Ombudsman has jurisdiction over the New Brunswick Police Commission. The Commission is not included in the Schedule to the Ombudsman Act, but the Ombudsman has a working agreement with the Commission allowing them to review Commission files.
  9. In Quebec, the Protecteur du citoyen has some jurisdiction over administrative procedural matters relating to child protection services provided by the directors of youth protection.
  10. The only police force operating in the Yukon is the RCMP, a federal body.

TOPICS

SUJETS

Find investigations and reports by topic:
Trouver une enquête par sujet :